Sony happy LCD TV

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Sony earns another chance by doing right...eventually.

It was a long, drawn out, and frustrating process, but I am finally satisfied with my response from Sony regarding my LCD TV. In my previous post, I detailed my problems with my Sony Bravia KDL46V3000 television. As the problem seemed to be widespread among many models of Sony TVs, although I did not get the extended warranty, I thought I had a strong case under the "Implied Warranty of Merchantability" as this seemed to be a design flaw. With this information in hand and a visit and problem summary from a Sony Platinum support technician, I started out to state my case.

I contacted Sony's support and customer relations, sent them my information, and later received an unacceptable token offer of a hundred dollars or so off retail on a model they were phasing out. I called again and pleaded my case to no avail. I wrote a letter to their Executive Review Committee that they acknowledged receiving but stated that their offer did not change. At this point, I filed a complaint with the New York State Consumer Protection Board and began to look at other options, including filing a lawsuit in small claims court.

After week or so passed with no response to the Consumer Protection Board letter to Sony, and my preliminary investigation into small claims court appearing that New York state is not consumer friendly in that you need to file against a corporation in the county in which they are registered, which in Sony's case is Albany County...a 3.5 hour drive from my home. Anger began when I saw an article on The Consumerist about a person with the same problems as me and who had blogged and Twittered about it (as I had) and Sony agreed to replace his television for free with a brand new television! Obviously followers and daily readers matter a lot when it comes to your web presence (his being significantly better than mine).

Given this information, I began to give up hope for a speedy resolution and started shopping for a new television (I eventually bought the Insignia NS-L46X-10A), as the Super Bowl and Olympics were just around the corner. Soon after, I received a welcome surprise in a letter from Sony received via the New York State Consumer Protection Board. While my initial subjective response was not of joy given the process I had been through and the greater value of a cash judgment in small claims court (given I already purchased a replacement television), an objective review of the offer convinced me that it is a fair attempt by Sony to resolve my dissatisfaction and the issue with the television. As such, I graciously accepted a settlement and I look forward to giving the replacement Sony television a chance to redeem the Sony brand name and make me consider Sony products again in the future.

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